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Facts for Cabbage

Cabbbage is high in fiber, vitamin C & K, and naturally fat free and cholesterol free.

Different varieties of cabbages have varying nutritional strength: purple cabbage has more vitamin C, while the savoy has more vitamin A, calcium, iron and potassium. Cabbages are an excellent source of fiber and vitamin K, and a good source of vitamin C, calcium, pottasium, and magnesium.

ref: “From Asparagus to Zucchini – A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce (3rd Edition), and Fruits and Veggies More Matters.

  • Cabbage is one of the oldest vegetables in existence and continues to be a dietary staple throughout the world.

  • Cabbage is a nutritional powerhouse that is an excellent source of manganese, vitamin B6, and folate; and a good source of thiamin, riboflavin, calcium, potassium, vitamin A, tryptophan, protein and magnesium.

  • There are at least a hundred different types of cabbage grown throughout the world, but the most common types in the United States are the Green, Red, and Savoy varieties.

  • Cabbage has virtually no fat. One cup of shredded raw cabbage contains 50 calories and 5 grams of dietary fiber.

  • Cabbage can be steamed, boiled, braised, microwaved, stuffed, or stir-fried, and eaten raw.

  • One cup of shredded raw cabbage contains 190% of the recommended daily amount of vitamin C.

  • Cabbage is an excellent source of vitamin K. 1 cup (150 grams) of shredded, boiled cabbage contains 91% of the recommended daily amount of vitamin K.

  • Cabbage and its relatives (broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts) are rich sources of phytochemicals, naturally-occurring plant chemicals that may protect people against some forms of cancer.

  • Cultures in which cabbage is a staple food, such as in Poland and some parts of China, show a low incidence of breast cancer. Research suggests this is due to the protective effect of sulfur-containing compounds in cabbage.