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Facts for Carrots

Carrots are an excellent source of beta-carotene, and contain high amount of fiber. Beta carotene is important for eyesight, skin health, and normal growth.

Carrots are a good source of fiber, vitamin C and potassium, as well as vitamin B6, folate, and several minerals including calcium and magnesium.

Carrots have a higher natural sugar content than all other vegetables with the exception of beets. This is why they make a wonderful snack when eaten raw and make a tasty addition to a variety of cooked dishes.

Key Facts about Carrots:

  • Just one medium carrot or a handful of baby carrots counts as one serving of your daily veggies.

  • Orange carrots are a great source of beta-carotene. Carrots contain a group of plant pigments called carotenoids, and beta-carotene is a member of this group. These plant pigments were first identified in carrots and therefore their name was derived from the word carrot.

  • Our bodies turn beta-carotene into vitamin A. Vitamin A is important for good health, especially for your eyes. Carrots are one of the best sources of vitamin A. Vitamin A is good for your bones, teeth, vision, and your skin.

  • Purple carrots contain purple pigments called anthocyanins, which act as anti-oxidants that protect the body.

  • Carrots are a good source of fiber, which is good for the health of your digestive system.

  • Washington ranks first in the nation in production of processing carrots and fourth in the nation in production of fresh carrots.

  • A baby carrot isn't exactly a baby. Baby carrots come from a large carrot that has been rolled over blades and thrown around in a metal cage to be rubbed down to a short, round-ended baby carrot.

  • Americans eat, on average, 10.6 lbs. of fresh carrots per person per year.

  • Carrots have a higher natural sugar content than all other vegetables with the exception of beets. This is why they make a wonderful snack when eaten raw and make a tasty addition to a variety of cooked dishes.

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